Category Archives: Misc

What Trump supporters think of family separations at the border

Mesa, Arizona (CNN)As the Trump administration has ramped up the practice of separating children from their parents at the border with no clear plan for reuniting them, critics have been unsparing, calling it “government-sanctioned child abuse.”

US law does not mandate separating undocumented families; the uptake in such separations is an effect of a zero-tolerance immigration policy the administration enacted in May to prosecute anyone who crosses the border illegally.
“I blame it on the parents for letting it happen because they bring them up and know they can’t get across there legally,” said Ron Carroll, a 69-year-old resident of Mesa, Arizona.
    Other supporters of US President Donald Trump say their feelings on family separation are not so cut and dry. “I don’t want to see families torn apart, but I also support enforcing the law,” said Jessica Lycos, a political consultant based in Phoenix.
    CNN spoke to eight people who identified as Trump supporters over two days in the border state of Arizona. Here’s what they had to say about the controversial practice:

    Ron Carroll

    Carroll was one of four supporters of who spoke to CNN on Tuesday about family separation over breakfast at Nana Dee’s Diner in Mesa.
    A retiree originally from St. Louis, Missouri, Carroll says President Trump should stand by the practice despite intensifying criticism.
    “He should enforce the laws like he’s doing, and our Congress needs to abide by the laws and follow the laws and enforce the laws. Not go against our President,” he said. He said he blames backlash over the practice on Congress for signing off on a law without knowing what it says, going back to the Obama administration.
    It has long been a misdemeanor federal offense to be caught illegally entering the United States, punishable by up to six months in prison. Previous administrations largely opted not to pursue criminal charges against people who crossed illegally with children, referring them instead mostly to immigration courts.
    Under zero tolerance, apprehended parents are held in federal prisons where their children can’t join them.
    “Like I said earlier, it’s the parents that bring them up, and they already know they’re going to take them away, so to me there’s no issue there, Carroll said.

    Madeline Carroll

    Carroll’s wife agreed with him that parents were to blame for being separated from their children. Family separation should be enforced as long as zero tolerance is an administration priority, she said.
    “To be perfectly honest, I’m angry at the parents,” she said. “I feel very honestly that it’s their fault that the children have been separated, because they’re bringing them in illegally. And the other thing is, the law that has been put on the books was not put on recently. It was put on back many years ago, and I think very seriously that they need very firmly to say enough is enough.”
    She faulted the media for using children to play on people’s emotions.
    “I think people need to stop constantly bringing up the poor children, the poor children. The parents are the problems. They’re the ones coming in illegally,” she said. “Quit trying to make us feel teary-eyed for the children. Yes, I love children a great deal, but to me, it’s up to the parents to do things rightfully and legally.”

    Carl Bier

    The 84-year-old retiree said undocumented immigrants should face consequences for trying to cross the border illegally. He worries about “bad guys” coming into the country, or that people may falsely claim to be parents to gain an advantage by using children that are not their own.
    “Here’s how I feel about it: When I was a kid, 16 years old, I got fined for swimming in a lake ’cause I didn’t follow the rules,” he said. “These people that we have coming across the border illegally are breaking the rules. I have no feelings for them at all.”

    Sonya Coppa

    This mother of two says children affected by family separation are the victims of their parents’ poor choices.
    “Unfortunately, those parents and those children are feeling what their choices are.”
    A resident of Globe, Arizona, she says she worries about families of undocumented immigrants living off the state. Parents should enter the country legally if they want to be here.
    “You can’t just come into this state and reap,” she said. “Do it legally, get your card, become a citizen pay your taxes. That’s what I believe in.”

    Jessica Lycos

    Lycos attends “Politics on the Rocks” meetups, a monthly networking happy hour for people whose politics skew conservative. She and three other members of the group who identified as Trump supporters sat down Monday with CNN in a restaurant in Scottsdale, a Phoenix suburb.
    Lycos said she doesn’t want to see families torn apart.But she said she could imagine scenarios in which separation might be appropriate, including when a family relationship can’t be proven or if the adult is suspected of another crime aside from illegally crossing the border. (Under the zero tolerance policy, neither scenario need apply for family separation to occur.)
    She said she believes that family separation is a symptom of bigger ruptures in the immigration system. “We have people who came here the right way. We need to fix the broken immigration system in general.”

    Brian Shiau

    The vice president of a private equity holding company, Shiau said he doesn’t believe that the administration intended to harm families.
    But it appears that the administration did not fully think through the “human aspect” of how enforcement of a zero tolerance policy would play out, he said.
    “I don’t think the people involved want to do it this way, but that’s the way that the policy has been instructed for them to do,” he said.

    Renee Padilla

    Padilla, who works in human resources said she does not support separating families at the border. But she supports securing the border, she said, and family separation is part of that, for better or worse.
    The practice of family separation started before the Trump administration, she said — it’s just now being implemented at a greater frequency through zero tolerance.
    “It’s not just involving separating the families — we’re trying to secure our borders to stop the drug trafficking, the sex trafficking and I think it goes a little deeper,” she said.
    “At the end of the day, to make America great again I think both sides of the aisle need to come together.

    Pascal Kropf

    Kropf, vice-president of “Politics on the Rocks,” said he doesn’t think children should be taken from their parents. But as long as a law that leads to family separation is “on the books,” it should be enforced.
    “If we don’t like it, let’s get together and change it. Let’s fix it,” he said. But, with the midterm elections coming up, and the tendency of politicians to play to their bases, he said he’s doubtful that bipartisan compromise will come soon.
    “Unfortunately … it’s politics.”

    Read more: https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/19/us/trump-voters-family-separation/index.html

    ‘People are hungry for real bookstores’: Judy Blume on why US indie booksellers are growing

    At 78, the multimillion-selling author has begun a new career, opening her own bookshop and joining a business sector thats flourishing again in the US

     

    She might be a beloved and bestselling author of classic childrens books from Forever to Blubber, but Judy Blume says she wakes up every day and I look to the sky, and I say, whoevers up there, I thank you for not having to write today.

    Blume doesnt have to write because, at 78, she has embarked on a new career: shes an independent bookseller. Together with her husband, George Cooper, she has opened a small, nonprofit bookshop in Key West, Florida, where shes working almost every day. And shes loving it. She had planned to take a gap year after she finished writing and promoting her last novel, In the Unlikely Event. I was going to relax and read and have this whole time with no pressure. And then bingo the chance comes along to open a bookshop, and there you go. I guess I like that in my life To learn something new like this, at 78, makes it all the more exciting.

    Blume and Cooper had been urging Mitchell Kaplan, founder of independent book chain Books & Books, to open a bookshop in Key West for years. He told them that if they could find a space, he would partner with them. They found a corner store, part of a large deco building , and with help from Kaplan and his team, Books & Books @ the Studios of Key West opened in February.

    A
    A very satisfying experience … Judy Blume behind the tills at Books & Books @ Key West. Photograph: Penguin Random House

    Weve done better than anyone, including Mitch, thought we could do, says Blume, down the line from Florida. It has been a very satisfying experience Writing In the Unlikely Event took five years it was very long and difficult and complicated. This is just a great change for me, and I am enjoying it so much.

    Customers, she says, sometimes recognise her an author who has sold more than 80m books around the world and theyre completely taken aback, especially if Im sitting there dusting the shelves. Im pretty good at recommendations Im good in the kids department for sure. I read all the picture books when they come in. And I can lead people to what they want, although Ive not read as many of our books as some of our volunteers [the store has two paid employees, as well as Cooper, Blume and a series of volunteers]. Im trying really hard to keep up. Its like Christmas every day, working here.

    Business for independent bookstores in America in general, is going well, Blume believes. I just think people are so hungry for a real bookstore again. So many people live in places where there isnt one Its not just us doing well. A lot of independent booksellers are.

    The figures back her up. At BookExpo America last week, the American Booksellers Association announced that for the seventh year in a row, its bookstore membership has gone up, to 1,775 members operating in 2,311 locations, up from 1,401 members operating in 1,651 locations in 2009. The lions share of these are independents, says the ABA: in 2015, sales for independent booksellers were up just over 10%, and are remaining strong in 2016. In the UK by contrast, the Booksellers Association recorded 894 independent bookshops in 2015, a decrease of 3% from 2014. A decade ago, there were more than 1,500.

    Independent bookselling in the US is continuing not just to grow, but to thrive, says ABA chief executive Oren Teicher, who attributes the growth to various factors: the localism movement, which is exploding, and we are benefiting from that; booksellers getting smarter at using technology; publishers increasing acknowledgment that customers discover books in bricks and mortar locations [so] our colleagues in publishing have figured out that they need bricks and mortar stores as much as we need their books; and the growing role of the bookseller as curator, in a world flooded with new titles.

    The resurgence of print has also helped, says Teicher. A recent report in the UK revealed that in 2015, sales of printed books were up by 0.4% to 2.76bn, while ebook sales fell for the first time in the seven years the Publishers Association has tracked them, down 1.6% to 554m in 2015. In the US, the Association of American Publishers reported last month that while overall sales for consumer books were up 0.8% to $7.2bn (4.9bn) in 2015, ebook sales declined, down 9.5% in adult books and 43.3% in children and young adult titles.

    Five years ago in the American book business, there was a widespread panic that somehow digital reading was going to replace physical books and they would be a relic of some other time and place. Fast forward to today, and I think digital reading has levelled off and calmed down slightly. Its going to be a piece of our business, but print books arent going away. Were living in a hybrid world, says Teicher.

    Added together, these ingredients make the recipe for our success, says Teicher. But there is still a very modest margin in books, and people have to work really hard. We have significant challenges before us, clouds on the horizon that could interfere with our success.

    These range from pressure on wages and rents, he says, to the 1,000lb gorilla the continued growth of online shopping. But independents are extraordinarily resilient, he says. If I had a penny for every time weve been counted out, Id be a pretty rich guy today.

    Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/may/20/people-are-hungry-for-real-bookstores-judy-blume-on-why-us-indie-booksellers-are-thriving

    15+ Reading Nooks Perfect For When You Need To Escape This World

    Although some people claim that they can read anywhere, anytime, we all know that a comfortable, well lit, soft spot is ideal. On a blanket in a park is one such perfect spot; on dry, spongy moss, under a tree, is another good location. But what happens if you’re a city dweller (or not even!), and outdoor reading spots are at a premium?

    Bored Panda has collected this list of reading nooks for you, those indoor bookworms that maybe like to read outside, but who also need a comfortable place inside to get the pages turning. Which reading nook looks most comfortable to you? Vote, or submit a picture of your own reading nook below! (h/t)

     

    #1 Cozy Reading Nook

    Report

    Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/cozy-reading-nooks-book-corner/

    Powered by WordPress | Designed by: photography charlottesville va | Thanks to ppc software, penny auction and larry goins